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Hoerr Schaudt

Luxe Magazine: Beyond the Cover

Posted on by Alison Strickler

This month’s Luxe Interiors + Design Magazine tells the story of how a century-old home in Lake Forest, IL was carefully restored to its original glory.

Hoerr Schaudt had the pleasure of collaborating with Rugo/Raff Architects, Athalie Derse Interior Design and the Heidbreder Building Group who, along with the client, all shared a very obvious passion for this project. We especially thank Mariani, the landscape maintenance company that installed the garden and continues to make sure it looks right! Finally–a big shout out to Luxe Magazine for putting together this stunning spread.

Architecture and site have their own personalities and moods as well as clients; the role of a landscape architect is to listen to all three. Doug Hoerr spent time on the site to understand how the clients live in the house and drew this out in the new design. Today we’ll go beyond the cover and further discuss his process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When we began, the footprint of the old garden was evident. There were changes in the grading that indicated the earlier design. In the woods, we found ornamentals that had been swallowed up by invasives. We really focused on re-energizing these remnants because the age of an old garden conveys a certain grace that is difficult to replicate with new materials.

The property is comprised of a wide variety of garden experiences, but we made sure that you don’t see all of them immediately. You see different views from each architectural structure.

 

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

      

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The architecture of the main house is stately but straightforward and bold.  It is designed on a central axis, leading from the front door to the back, and we continued this symmetry into the landscape by creating a stone pathway and fountain that stretch from the back door out to the pool.

This central spine of the property organizes the landscape with a variety of garden areas that spin off from it – some are formal, some are more fluid.  Along the spine, repeated clumps of hydrangea create a rhythm and add to the formality of the walk.

 

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Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

A change in level as you enter the pool area signals a shift from a more disciplined and formal space into a more relaxed area in both design and function. From here, the design eventually knits itself into the natural woodland that is at the back of the property.

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

 

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

 

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

This house had an envelope of natural woodland around it and we tried to honor that context as much as we could. We analyzed the site and found that the woodland remnants on the site are part of a nature corridor leading to a nearby water source.

We kept that link open and designed the property to transition from active and formal spaces for humans to more relaxed and naturalistic spaces that are friendlier for wildlife.

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

 

 

 

A lot of what we did in the naturalized areas was to edit and incorporate what was there from prior gardens. Here, you can see the remnants of an arborvitae allee and orchard that we preserved, even as we knit it into a more naturalized landscape.

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

Photo Credit: Scott Shigley

Inside and out, the finished product is nothing short of a work of art that will surely stand the test of the next 100 years.

Read the full story here  —or view the whole magazine at luxesource.com. (article on p. 185)

 


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